animalstalkinginallcaps:

TEN MINUTES AGO I WAS READY TO GO AND NAIL THIS JOB INTERVIEW, BUT THE SILENT PRESSURE EXERTED UPON THE POPULATION BY THE MEDIA HAS TURNED A SIMPLE FEATHER CHECK INTO A ROLLERCOASTER OF NEUROSES AND DESPAIR. 
MY EYES ARE GROSS, MY BEAK IS TOO STRAIGHT,  AND I’VE GOT THE COLORING OF SOMEONE TWICE MY AGE.
WHY WOULD ANYONE HIRE SUCH A HIDEOUS FREAK?
DAMN IT ALL TO HELL.

animalstalkinginallcaps:

TEN MINUTES AGO I WAS READY TO GO AND NAIL THIS JOB INTERVIEW, BUT THE SILENT PRESSURE EXERTED UPON THE POPULATION BY THE MEDIA HAS TURNED A SIMPLE FEATHER CHECK INTO A ROLLERCOASTER OF NEUROSES AND DESPAIR. 

MY EYES ARE GROSS, MY BEAK IS TOO STRAIGHT,  AND I’VE GOT THE COLORING OF SOMEONE TWICE MY AGE.

WHY WOULD ANYONE HIRE SUCH A HIDEOUS FREAK?

DAMN IT ALL TO HELL.

803 notes

bombing:

3D Paintings by Shintaro Ohata 

[Artists statement]
Shintaro Ohata is an artist who depicts little things in everyday life like scenes of a movie and captures all sorts of light in his work with a unique touch: convenience stores at night, city roads on rainy day and fast-food shops at dawn etc. His paintings show us ordinary sceneries as dramas. He is also known for his characteristic style; placing sculptures in front of paintings, and shows them as one work, a combination of 2-D and 3-D world. He says that it all started from when he wondered “I could bring the atmosphere or dynamism of my paintings with a more different way if I place sculptures in front of paintings”. Many viewers tend to assume that there is a light source set into his work itself because of the strong expression of lights in his sculpture.

15,998 notes

2brwngrls:

filmmemory:

New Sundance review on Shadow and Act: Fruitvale
Fruitvale has become the darling of this year’s Sundance festival, and rightly so. The drama, chronicles the real-life murder of 22-year-old Oscar Grant, who in the early hours of New Year’s Day 2009 was fatally shot in the back by an officer after being detained in the wake of an altercation that he was not involved with. The incident, captured by the camera phones of numerous onlookers at the Fruitvale BART train station in San Francisco, prompted national outrage in what was not the first and would certainly not be the last senseless murder of a young black man at the hands of law enforcement. Helmed by first-time director Ryan Coogler and produced by Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer (who makes a brief but powerful appearance in the film as Grant’s mother), the film puts as much focus on the fatal shooting as it does on what preceded it, painting a picture of Oscar as not only a symbol of police injustice, but as a son, a father to a young daughter (Ariana Neal) and a boyfriend trying to do right by his girl (the wonderful Melonie Diaz).
The cast, rounded out by Chad Michael Murray, Kevin Durand, and Ahna O’Reilly are all stellar, but it’s lead actor Michael B. Jordan who truly carries the emotional weight of the film. Jordan has turned in what will most definitely be a career-defining performance. Best known for his work on the TV series Friday Night Lights and more recently the found footage movie Chronicle, the young actor has proven here that he is not only ready but seriously deserving of so-called A-List status. The quiet beauty of the role is that he isn’t perfect - at the top of the film Oscar has only just ended his weed-selling; a flashback later in the film reveals his mother visiting him in prison for an undivulged crime. Still, Coogler takes care to frame his screenplay, no matter Grant’s passed mistakes, as ultimately the story of an extremely decent person…
Read the rest here.

Zeba’s review of Fruitvale

2brwngrls:

filmmemory:

New Sundance review on Shadow and Act: Fruitvale

Fruitvale has become the darling of this year’s Sundance festival, and rightly so. The drama, chronicles the real-life murder of 22-year-old Oscar Grant, who in the early hours of New Year’s Day 2009 was fatally shot in the back by an officer after being detained in the wake of an altercation that he was not involved with. The incident, captured by the camera phones of numerous onlookers at the Fruitvale BART train station in San Francisco, prompted national outrage in what was not the first and would certainly not be the last senseless murder of a young black man at the hands of law enforcement.

Helmed by first-time director Ryan Coogler and produced by Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer (who makes a brief but powerful appearance in the film as Grant’s mother), the film puts as much focus on the fatal shooting as it does on what preceded it, painting a picture of Oscar as not only a symbol of police injustice, but as a son, a father to a young daughter (Ariana Neal) and a boyfriend trying to do right by his girl (the wonderful Melonie Diaz).

The cast, rounded out by Chad Michael Murray, Kevin Durand, and Ahna O’Reilly are all stellar, but it’s lead actor Michael B. Jordan who truly carries the emotional weight of the film.

Jordan has turned in what will most definitely be a career-defining performance. Best known for his work on the TV series Friday Night Lights and more recently the found footage movie Chronicle, the young actor has proven here that he is not only ready but seriously deserving of so-called A-List status. The quiet beauty of the role is that he isn’t perfect - at the top of the film Oscar has only just ended his weed-selling; a flashback later in the film reveals his mother visiting him in prison for an undivulged crime. Still, Coogler takes care to frame his screenplay, no matter Grant’s passed mistakes, as ultimately the story of an extremely decent person…

Read the rest here.

Zeba’s review of Fruitvale

163 notes

passionateforthings:

philliptunalunatique:

begitalarcos:

AU: Loki gets detention for lipping off a teacher,

When he gets there he finds some familiar faces who have also gotten detention

avengers breakfast club!au?? yes pLEASE

I didn’t realize how much I wanted high school!Avengers until right now.

63,715 notes

itscarororo:

This is pretty personal for me and I’m a little nervous to post it, but making it was therapeutic.  

I was diagnosed with clinical depression when I was young (it runs in my family) and throughout my life I have encountered a lot of misinformation about it.  There is definitely a stigma against mental illnesses because they are invisible.  People tell you you should just try harder and think positively and get over it, but depression is a disorder that just doesn’t work that way.  

I hope that any of you out there suffering from it, or anxiety, or anything else like that gets the help you need.  Talk to someone if you can, make a doctor’s appointment, research your options.  The first step is the hardest, but it’s the most important one.

15,528 notes

videohall:

These videos blow my mind every time

232,648 notes

splashofhope:














REBLOG AND THEN
GO
ON
YOUR
BLOG
AND CLICK ON THE PICTURE. USE YOUR WEBCAM OR NOT.


This is the most wondrous thing. I have turned off all of my lights and I’m sat under my duvet like a secret pioneer into this fantastic little world that I can’t stop watching.


Genuinely one of the coolest things I’ve come across on here.


Ok this is amazing


I spent like 20 minutes just watching it.


omg i dont reblog stuff but fhdbsjfhdbshjfs this needs to be on my tumblr omg //stares


WOAHHH K TURNED THE LIGHTS OUT. TOOK ME A WHILE BUT WHAOOAOOOAHHH

splashofhope:

REBLOG AND THEN

GO

ON

YOUR

BLOG

AND CLICK ON THE PICTURE. USE YOUR WEBCAM OR NOT.

This is the most wondrous thing. I have turned off all of my lights and I’m sat under my duvet like a secret pioneer into this fantastic little world that I can’t stop watching.

Genuinely one of the coolest things I’ve come across on here.

Ok this is amazing

I spent like 20 minutes just watching it.

omg i dont reblog stuff but fhdbsjfhdbshjfs this needs to be on my tumblr omg //stares

WOAHHH K TURNED THE LIGHTS OUT. TOOK ME A WHILE BUT WHAOOAOOOAHHH

(Source: spiritual-realm)

464,119 notes

colinquinn:

Something we’ve always liked, but wont be done any better than this.
Distorted Anamorphic Sculptures by Jonty Hurwitz

colinquinn:

Something we’ve always liked, but wont be done any better than this.

Distorted Anamorphic Sculptures by Jonty Hurwitz

4,501 notes

ellende-generes:

Left this for my parents.

Woo yay another gay Laurel! There are not enough of us.

ellende-generes:

Left this for my parents.

Woo yay another gay Laurel! There are not enough of us.

139,906 notes

You know that place between sleep and awake; That place where you can still remember dreaming? That’s where I will always love you. That’s where I will always be waiting.
Peter Pan, by J.M. Barrie  (via barebrownboy)

(Source: browngirlinterrupted)

59 notes

Perfectly respectable Victorian women wrote to each other in terms such as these: ‘I hope for you so much, and feel so eager for you… that the expectation once more to see your face again, makes me feel hot and feverish.’ They recorded the ‘furnace blast’ of their ‘passionate attachments’ to each other… They carved their initials into trees, set flowers in front of one another’s portraits, danced together, kissed, held hands, and endured intense jealousies over rivals or small slights… Today if a woman died and her son or husband found such diaries or letters in her effects, he would probably destroy them in rage or humiliation. In the nineteenth century, these sentiments were so respectable that surviving relatives often published them in elegies…. [In the 1920s] people’s interpretation of physical contact became extraordinarily ‘privatized and sexualized,’ so that all types of touching, kissing, and holding were seen as sexual foreplay rather than accepted as ordinary means of communication that carried different meanings in different contexts… It is not that homosexuality was acceptable before; but now a wider range of behavior opened a person up to being branded as a homosexual… The romantic friendships that had existed among many unmarried men in the nineteenth century were no longer compatible with heterosexual identity.

Stephanie Coontz (via crookedceremonies)

Men may not have been quite this effusive, but as she alludes to at the end of the paragraph, their friendships were also much more overtly emotional - and put in what we’d today consider “romantic” terminology - in the nineteenth century. This leads to all sorts of confused misreading of texts from that period now: I once went to a talk with Doris Kearns Goodwin about Team of Rivals when she had to explain (rather wearily) to somebody that Lincoln ALMOST CERTAINLY WAS NOT A HOMOSEXUAL just because he wrote very emotional letters to his friends.

The way sex and sexuality functioned in the Victorian era is (obviously) totally fascinating because people were not nearly as clueless as we like to think they were about all of these things, but sex was just never up for discussion. So if you read highbrow novels from the period (the Brontës, George Eliot, etc), they can’t actually explicitly discuss sex, but the authors use language that would have said very clearly to any reader with two brain cells to rub together that sex was happening, or had happened, or whatever. But even though people did know about sex, I think it was very much outside the sphere of friendship - or even romance, hence something like Jane Eyre being considered extremely “coarse” and scandalous - and so it would never have occurred to people that two women or men who were extremely close and overtly affectionate were sexually involved in any way. And there was no sense of certain traits that we would today associate with homosexuality being connected to sexuality at all: so Oscar Wilde, who basically created the stereotype of the flamboyant gay man, was enormously popular everywhere until it came out that he was having sex with a man. Then, all of the sudden, all of the characteristics that people had found charming years before became associated with homosexuality - most queer theorists would say that “homosexuality” as such actually has its genesis as an idea/identity in the direct aftermath of the Wilde trial - and therefore become utterly taboo.

I’m not an expert in this stuff (grad school: probably in my future, sigh), but I think it’s fascinating that one event, even one as significant as the Wilde trial, can have such a massive impact not only on the culture but on the fundamental way people interact with each other. It’s a startlingly fast shift - one that you might argue corresponds in a way with the rapid and radical acceptance of gay people in society in the past twenty years or so (in the developed Western world), although that wasn’t sparked by a single event on the scale of the Wilde trial. Obviously homophobia and prejudice are still very real and pervasive, but when you think about what was broadly considered acceptable public speech/debate in the early- to mid-nineties, even amongst the more liberal half of the population, as compared to now, it’s pretty astonishing.

(via morgan-leigh)

absolutely. when it comes to the way men behaved with each other in england, the wilde trial was like a switch being flipped. just look at all those holmeses and watsons strolling around arm-in-arm right up until the 1890s hit.

(via hellotailor)

(Source: kissmyasuka)

6,239 notes